Not content with playing golf every third day, Trump now installs a golf simulator in the White House

Fourth Wall. All those days of the shutdown got to Trump, because golfing in Florida had bad optics, so he needs something to do during Executive Time.

We saw an inkling of that when he retweeted swing tips. Why waste time parenting, or walking a dog. Too bad it’s not the Matrix, but a $50,000 simulator probably has at least one Trump course programmed on it. And he certainly didn’t want to use the one that PBO had installed, but the brand used at Trump golf courses.

Considering the average of $3 million per Florida golf trip, it could be spun as a bargain, even if there’s no simulated chocolate cake or simulated handbag designer to be awarded an ambassadorship.

President Trump has installed a room-sized “golf simulator” game at the White House, which allows him to play virtual rounds at courses all over the world by hitting a ball into a large video screen, @jdawsey1 and @Fahrenthold scoop: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/president-trump-installed-a-room-sized-golf-simulator-at-white-house/2019/02/13/ed3f6d5c-2e45-11e9-813a-0ab2f17e305b_story.html?utm_term=.994df7192ca8 

But this winter, as Trump’s demand for a border wall triggered a month-long government shutdown, Trump stayed off the golf course for about 69 days, the longest such period of his presidency. Trump broke the streak on Feb. 2, playing with golf legends Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus at Trump’s course in Jupiter, Fla.

Trump complained to friends during the shutdown that he missed Mar-a-Lago and being at his Florida golf course.

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That system offers choices: players can play on a digital copy of the famous St. Andrews course in Scotland, or on fictional courses made up just for the game. One offers the chance to play nine holes among “temples, volcanoes and dinosaur skeletons” in a South American jungle.

Players then hit a real ball into the screen, and sensors track the speed, spin and path of the ball. Then, the computer takes over. It transforms that real shot into a virtual one, and shows the ball soaring over fairways (or dinosaur skeletons) toward the hole.

When the digital ball rolls to a stop, the player resets with a real ball and smacks it into the screen again.